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Technology Showcase: Matrix Switchers

Scalability is just one feature in a long list. 9/01/2009 10:14 AM Eastern

Technology Showcase: Matrix Switchers

Sep 1, 2009 2:14 PM, By Jay Ankeney

Scalability is just one feature in a long list.




In the world of switchers, you need to know whose turf you are on if you want to understand the lingo. In the video production arena, a switcher is used to manipulate the audio/video material to create effects. In the IT world, a switch is the traffic cop for IP signals. In the pro AV game, however, the main goal of a switcher is to provide multiple pathways for multiple signals while getting them from input A to output B as pristinely as possible.

For many people in the pro AV world, the terms switcher, switch, and router are fairly interchangeable. For others, routers are considered intersections while switches are analagous to streets. Perhaps Dr. Samuel Johnson provided the most eloquent definition for this kind of networking device as, “any thing reticulated or decussated, at equal distances, with interstices between the intersections,” but then that was for his 1755 Dictionary of the English Language.

Modern routers or switchers were originally intended to replace hand-plugged patch panels to move signals around, as seen in classic film scenes of women at early switchboards jamming 1/4in. jacks into walls of holes while intoning, “Number pleeaze.” Crosspoint switchers have been around since the ’70s, with some of the first being developed by Grass Valley, Richmond Hill Labs, and TeleMation for use in television stations.

Today, there are routers or switchers designed to handle the whole spectrum of signals that pro AV deals with. These can include IP signals; multiple flavors of analog/digital computer, home theater, or production video and audio; and recently, “3 Gig” (3Gbps) bandwidth for 1080p images and even keyboard, video monitor, mouse (KVM) control protocols. One of the most elaborate classes of these “interstices between intersections” systems has grown to become the matrix switcher that, as the name implies, allows a bunch of incoming signals to get to any number of selected output destinations intact.

Conventionally, matrix switchers are described by the number of inputs against the number of outputs, expressed for example as 32x32. In fact, anything from 8x8 to 32x32 is considered among the smaller class of matrix switchers. It can extend up to the thousands for larger matrix switchers, and with some newer modular designs, the upper limit is left to the imagination of the system installer.

Maintaining the required signal integrity involves more than just spreading the flow to multiple ports. A digital matrix switcher needs to have a receiving buffer circuit on its input that regenerates the signal to its nominal level. The digital signal is then passed unprocessed through a crosspoint matrix made up of large-scale integrated circuits that direct it to the desired output. Once it’s there, a digital video driver chip is evoked to re-establish its level to 800mV while a reclocking circuit puts the signal into a more stable time base before it is distributed to its destination device.

The inputs of an analog matrix switcher have some kind of equalization circuitry, usually compensating for the high-frequency roll-off accrued during cable delivery. After steering it through the crosspoint array composed of discrete components, an output driver restores the signal to the nominal level of 1V peak-to-peak, matches its impedance, and presents it to the desired destination.

The traditional design philosophy of matrix switchers has been to make them as transparent as possible, but in recent years, some manufacturers have proposed the idea that adding format-conversion capabilities built into the system has enabled some of them to convert baseband signals from analog to digital or digital to analog and from one format to another. Others leave that to external devices.

Matrix switchers are increasingly being used in settings that involve destination systems of many heritages and each with their own legacy. Commonly used throughout corporate installations, digital signage networks, command and control centers, university campuses, sports complexes, and even simulation theaters, matrix switchers need to serve the needs of a variety of solicitors.

That is why reliable 24/7 operation is key, so most matrix switchers have redundant power supplies and several forms of internal diagnostics. They can also be manipulated by an equally wide assortment of controllers, either external IP web interfaces, RS-232 devices, or onboard control panels. Control of the switcher can also be facilitated by routing KVM signals to keyboards throughout the system.

Recognizing that modern matrix switchers cover a wide spectrum of applications, each with a burgeoning array of features, here is a look at some of the most interesting offerings from the major manufacturers.

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Technology Showcase: Matrix Switchers

Sep 1, 2009 2:14 PM, By Jay Ankeney

Scalability is just one feature in a long list.




Altinex V-Matrix

The V-Matrix from Altinex is a versatile matrix switcher capable of routing I/O matrices of 8x8 up to 128x128 (in increments of eight) and handling signals ranging in complexity from audio to composite video and high-bandwidth RGBHV. Based on a unique new design, the V-Matrix matrix switcher provides flexible modularity thanks to the use of independent elements for its housing enclosure, matrix router, input cards, and output cards. All input and output cards, as well as the basic enclosure, can be virtually stripped down to their bare metal essentials and rebuilt with user-friendly pluggable pieces—including the Matrix Engine and dual A/C power supply—without removing them from the rack.

For larger markets, the MultiTasker product line from Altinex lets you configure any size of matrix switchers as small as 4x4 and as large as 64x64. Various signal formats are also available through the MultiTasker matrix switchers, including composite video, S-Video, HDTV/component video, VGA, twisted pairs, andmono and stereo audio.

Atlona AT-PROHD88M-SR

Atlona AT-PROHD88M-SR

The AT-PROHD88M-SR from Atlona Technologies is a true 8x8:2 HDMI matrix switcher featuring eight HDMI 1.3 inputs and eight independently switchable HDMI plus twisted-pair outputs to feed eight separate displays simultaneously. Each output features one HDMI and two twisted-pair connections where both are active at the same time. The transmission distance of the AT-PROHD88M-SR’s twisted-pair (Cat-5/6) outputs can reach up to 100ft. at 1080p with infrared control signal. The system also has the ability to equalize, amplify, and reclock the signal to ensure accurate HDMI signal transmission through long cables without quality loss. Atlona Technologies’ extended display identification data (EDID) management function stores 100 of the most common EDID recordings, and the user can program new EDID recordings.

The Epica DGX 32 customizable fiber-based matrix switchers from AMX break conventional distance barriers by sending video resolutions up to 1920x1200 over 6000ft. The Epica DGX 32 is available in input/output configurations from 4x4 to 32x32 and is customizable with any combination of DGX fiber input boards, local DVI input boards, DGX fiber output boards, or local DVI output boards. With this system, AMX lets you transmit signals 3000ft. to the Epica DGX 32 and 3000ft. after the Epica DGX 32 for a possible total signal path of 6000ft.

AMX also has its Epica DGX 144 large-scale single-strand multimode fiber matrix switcher in a compact 16RU enclosure. It can hold a selection of DGX fiber input boards, DGX fiber output boards, local DVI input boards, local HD-15 input boards, and local HD-SDI input boards. The AMX Epica DGX 144 converts, switches, and transports any input to any DGX fiber output regardless of signal style.

As part of its Aspyre series series of matrices and extenders, just this month Aurora Multimedia will be bringing out a new 8x8 matrix switcher called the ASP-88—the first of this kind of product produced under its own name. The ASP-88 is 1RU and fully HDMI 1.3c-compliant, and it has EDID learning from connected devices built in. It also has independent high-bandwidth digital content protection (HDCP) handling so any number of outputs can be provided with digital copy projection in a one in, many out fashion, while still allowing other inputs to direct HDCP to other outputs. The 16 buttons on the front panel can be used to select inputs and outputs or as profile presets, enabling the operator to store up to 16 user-defined configurations.

The most popular line of matrix switchers from AVocation Systems is its Peak series. (The company is from Colorado, deep in the Rocky mountains. Get it?) For easy field operation and programming for controllers, the AVocation Systems matrix in its Peak series uses simple ASCII commands for both configuration and control. All video and audio signals on a single input can be routed using a single command in the Peak series routers. It also features a Salvo mode in which a single input can be routed to up to eight outputs with just one command. All routing, volume control, and preset functions are available through IR control. All models in the AVocation Systems Peak series are equipped with internationally rated auto switching power supplies and are capable of passing NTSC, PAL, SECAM video, allowing the matrix to be used worldwide.

For crosspoint switching of PC or HD (VGA or YPbPr) video signals, Black Box Network Services recommends its AC1120A matrix switcher, which outputs PC resolutions up to 1900x1200 and HD video up to 1080p under two independent serial RS-232 interfaces, a screw terminal, and an RJ-45 port. The AC1120A matrix switcher can also be programmed to switch between preset patterns at certain times of the day—great for automating video distribution to digital signage—and it interfaces with Black Box Mini Cat-5 extenders for transmitting VGA signals over Cat-5 cable. The AC1123A is a VGA and audio matrix switcher with IP and serial control and 16x16 cross­point switching. It offers IP control of matrix switching provided through its 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX port using Telnet or a virtual serial port driver.

Blackmagic Design has extended its Videohub line of routers with its new Enterprise Videohub, a massive 144x288 model, and Studio Videohub, a compact 16x32 model. The Enterprise Videohub features a single-circuit board design, which reduces degradation of high-speed data signals such as 3Gbps SDI. The Studio Videohub replaces the original Workgroup Videohub. However, it features larger 16x32 SDI routing and is physically smaller at only 2RU tall. Enterprise Videohub provides redundant power connections, SDI re­clocking, and 3Gbps SDI technology all in a compact rack chassis less than 3in. deep. Studio Videohub includes the same great SDI reclocking and 3Gbps SDI technology all in a compact rack chassis less than 1in. deep.


Technology Showcase: Matrix Switchers

Sep 1, 2009 2:14 PM, By Jay Ankeney

Scalability is just one feature in a long list.




Communications Specialties Fiberlink Matrix 32x32 optical router

Communications Specialties Fiberlink Matrix 32x32 optical router

Available with LC or ST connectors, the Fiberlink Matrix 32x32 optical router from Communications Specialties is fully compliant with SMPTE 297-2006, supports up to 3G-SDI data rates, and works with both single-mode and multimode fiber. Unique to the Fiberlink Matrix is the ability to configure the number of inputs and outputs in any fashion. The 3RU tall Fiberlink Matrix is easy to operate with the multicolored and illuminated front-panel buttons, and it can be remotely controlled via RS-232 or the Ethernet-based GUI. Operators can quickly and easily create, store, and recall operational presets. They can even transport those presets to other Fiberlink Matrix routers via the front-panel USB port.

Crestron DM-MD8X8

Crestron DM-MD8X8

As part of the DigitalMedia product line from Crestron, the DM-MD8X8 matrix switcher is field-configurable to handle up to eight sources and to provide up to eight DM room outputs with expansion capability for even larger applications. The DM-MD8X8 is capable of accepting and distributing all analog audio and video, uncompressed digital signals, HDMI, DVI, DisplayPort, HD-SDI, Ethernet, and USB keyboard/mouse control. Its larger brother, the DM-MD16X16, offers a choice of eight or 16 factory-configured twisted-pair or fiber DM outputs (or eight of each). Both feature input cards for every signal type, including the HDMI card with DSP. Using multimode fiber, such as Crestron CresFiber, DM signals can be transmitted up to 1 kilometer because CresFiber is standard cable using SC connectors and guarantees the 1.2GHz of bandwidth necessary to transmit 1080p with deep color.

The PureLink line from Dtrovision has now been expanded by its new MX-1800 (18x18) and MX-3600 (36x36) modular digital matrix router series, which combines DVI or HDMI in one chassis for large-scale everything-to-everything 1080p HD routing. Since they are a modular design, users can buy the chassis model that fits their needs and populate the input slots with boards of their choice while maintaining the integrity of HDCP throughout. The MX-1800 and MX-3600 support up to WUXGA (1920x1200) resolution at 60Hz as well as 1080p60.

For a less-expensive integrated design, Dtrovision offers the DX-8800 Pro (8x8), DX-6600 Pro (6x6), and DX-4400 Pro (4x4) matrix switchers, which include a breakthrough feature called Flexible EDID Management that PureLike claims is “the most advanced EDID functionality available today,” thanks to an EDID emulator on an erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM) chip on every output. Controllable by any external controller (e.g. Vista Systems Spyder, Barco Encore), the DX-8800 Pro, DX-6600 Pro, and DX-4400 Pro boast two-line LCD displays for intuitively rapid switching, pixel reclocking, and error correction for optimal picture quality.

The EQX platform from Evertz has the ability to route up to 576x576 signals in a compact 26RU frame designed for performance ultrawideband routing, making it ideal for mission-critical and demanding 24/7 applications. In convenient steps of 18, the number of inputs and/or outputs can be increased from the base size of 18x18 all the way up to 576x576 and beyond in square and nonsquare configurations. The EQX’s Source-By-Source intelligent autoconfiguration capability allows the path to each destination to be independently and instantly reconfigured to suit the requirements of the source being switched. This includes autoselecting the reclocking/nonreclocking circuitry, the ASI mode, as well as the correct switch point.

For smaller installations, Evertz offers its cost-effective EQT-3232, a 32x32 SD/HD/3G front-accessible router. Both the input and output stage of the EQT are fixed at 32 in the coaxial version and expandable in blocks of two (to a max of 32) in the fiber version. The power supply for the EQT router is internal, but the EQT can also be fitted with an optional redundant internal power supply that is hot-swappable.

Extron Electronics makes both fiber and twisted-pair matrix switchers. The new MTPX Plus series comprises the most integration-friendly twisted-pair matrix switchers on the market, enabling AV systems to be installed with greater efficiency thanks to enhanced integration features such as dynamic skew compensation, local audio outputs, local RS-232 insertion ports, and local video inputs and outputs. The MTPX Plus 128 features EDID Minder, a selectable feature that enables automatic and continuous management of the EDID information between the local input sources and the local displays. In addition, the Extron MPX Plus 866 A ProDSP media presentation matrix switcher is actually four matrix switchers in one: 8x6 VGA, 6x6 composite video or S-video, 14x6 stereo audio, and 4x6 mic/line matrix mixer.

On the fiber side, Extron’s Fox 4G Matrix 14400 is a high-performance, modular fiber-optic matrix switcher for large-scale systems that require complete, end-to-end digital AV signal transmission and routing over fiber-optic cable. It is expandable from 16x16 to 144x144 in size, and it supports up to 4.25Gbps all-digital switching. It boasts perfect pixel-for-pixel transmission of video, computer video, DVI, and HD-SDI.


Technology Showcase: Matrix Switchers

Sep 1, 2009 2:14 PM, By Jay Ankeney

Scalability is just one feature in a long list.




Gefen 4x4 Matrix for HDMI 1.3

Gefen 4x4 Matrix for HDMI 1.3

Gefen also provides its 4x4 Component with Audio over Cat-5 matrix switcher that enables direct connections among any four component video sources and four displays with audio inputs and outputs in digital and analog formats. Users can opt for small individual receivers at each display to extend video and audio signals over just one Cat-5 cable up to 300 meters with a perfect replication of audio and video resolutions to 1080p.

Grass Valley Triton

Grass Valley Triton

Versatility is key for the Triton Plus routing switchers from Grass Valley because of the breadth of signal types it supports, including 3Gbps for 1080p, HD-SDI, SDI, analog video, analog audio, and data routing signal formats. Despite its small size, the Triton Plus routing switcher delivers all the value expected in a Grass Valley routing switcher. Triton Plus is available in several sizes, including 8x8, 16x2, 16x16, 2x32, and 64x64. You can select from a either a built-in control panel or 13 standalone control panels to build your system. Routers and control panels connect together using Cat-5 cables and RJ-45 connectors. In addition, Triton Plus has a matrix partitioning feature to easily create two and four levels of routing within a single chassis.

Hall Research Technology Genesis

Hall Research Technology Genesis

The Genesis product line from Hall Research Technologies contains both compact and high-end matrix switches for video and audio. The Genesis AV matrix switcher is a 16x16 and 8x8 VGA/HDTV design with front-panel, RS-232, and IP control, and it features wide bandwidth for resolutions to 1920x1200 or HD (1080p). The Genesis AV matrix switcher embeds video, audio, power, and RS-232 in a single Cat-5 cable. Its outputs can be blanked (video) or muted (audio), and it features a VU meter (sound level) bar graph display on the front panel with RJ-45 outputs for video-over-twisted-pair (UTP) transmission.

Since all of Harris’ broadcast equipment is 3Gbps-capable, it’s no surprise that all its HD Panacea routers offer 3Gbps performance in 1RU or 2RU sizes, giving you 1080p performance at HD-SDI (1.485Gbps) prices. The 2RU Panacea 32x32 model comes with either universal AC or DC power supplies or external (brick) universal power supplies, and it can have an integrated redundant power supply.

Harris Platinum MX

Harris Platinum MX

Harris’s Platinum MX is part of its Platinum line of routing switchers, which combines a highly robust architecture with the flexibility required to future-proof your investment. The distributed control system used in each Platinum MX routing switcher is unique in the industry in that it does not require a separate, centralized controller. Each Platinum MX frame features redundant control modules that store configuration information related to that frame in nonvolatile memory.

Comprehensive control options in the DIGI-HDMI-4X4 matrix switcher from Intelix can be accessed via its diagnostic front-panel interface, a remote RS-232 control system, IR, or over Ethernet, making the DIGI-HDMI-4X4 an easy-to-use twisted-pair routing system for high-definition audio/video distribution applications. The DIGI-HDMI-4X4 features four HDMI inputs, four HDMI outputs, and four twisted-pair extender outputs. The matrix supports 1080i and 1080p high-definition video, and it is HDMI 1.3b-compliant.

Knox Video Technologies Chameleon 256 HB

Knox Video Technologies Chameleon 256 HB

Also from Intelix come the DIGI-VGASD-8X8 and DIGI-VGASD-16X16 matrix switchers, which combine a comprehensive audio/video switcher with Intelix’s extremely efficient twisted-pair extenders. The DIGI-VGASD-8X8 and DIGI-VGASD-16X16 each boast a separate internal control matrix that provides independent bidirectional RS-232 and IR switching and distribution. Both units work with a modular receive unit, Intelix’s DIGI-VGASD-WP-R wallplate receiver, reaching out to 350ft. on a single twisted-pair cable.

A unique feature of the Chameleon 256 HB custom-configurable matrix switcher (known to insiders as the Cham256HB 16x64 RGB VO FPC IPO) from Knox Video Technologies is a 7in. HD input preview monitor on the front panel that saves money and space in its installation. The Chameleon 256 HB is a 16x64 high-definition component matrix switcher that is ideal for the hospitality market, uses a card structure that is field-serviceable, has intuitive keypad control with directions printed on a separate LCD operator’s screen, and features hot-swappable power supplies serviceable in the field. Knox Video Technologies can provide the Chameleon 256 HB in a remarkably quick one-day turnaround.


Technology Showcase: Matrix Switchers

Sep 1, 2009 2:14 PM, By Jay Ankeney

Scalability is just one feature in a long list.




Kramer Electronics VP-4x4K

Kramer Electronics VP-4x4K

The VP-4x4K from Kramer Electronics is a high-performance analog matrix switcher designed for computer-graphic video signals thanks to its 15-pin VGA connector, with resolutions including VGA, UXGA, and higher. Along with the video, the VP-4x4K can also route balanced stereo audio signals to any or all outputs simultaneously. With Kramer Electronics’ KR-ISP advanced sync processing, the VP-4x4K ensures compatibility with a wide range of computers (even if the sync level is too low) by restoring the sync signal waveform, and the unit can store multiple switches as presets to be recalled and executed when needed.

For digital video, Kramer Electronics offers its VS-42HDMI, VS-44HDMI, and VS-66HDMI matrix switchers for HDMI signals. Each reclocks and equalizes the HDMI signal and can route any input to any or all outputs simultaneously. They also benefit from Kramer’s Smart EDID technology whose dedicated memory for each input captures an EDID setting from a device connected to the output and stores it in nonvolatile memory.

MutiDyne EOS-4288

MutiDyne EOS-4288

Building on the success of its Mondo Matrix II, Magenta Research’s Mondo Matrix III improves UTP switching and extension by adding optional addressable duplex capability that enables digital signage applications to collect individual display data and metrics in addition to independent control over each display. It allows the addition of inputs and outputs in increments of 16, and it can support an impressive maximum configuration of 256x512. Compatibility with all of Magenta’s MultiView products enables the Mondo Matrix III to extend 1920x1200 video, stereo audio, and serial signals over 2000ft. (609 meters) thanks to patented, proprietary technology that includes a 9-band equalizer system.

In addition, Magenta’s latest offering, its new Infinea Opto Matryx, combines HDMI, DVI, RS-232, audio, and USB into a simple, scalable platform. The Infinea Opto Matryx’s unique USB switching and extension capability on every input and output—an industry first—enables a new level of interactive digital signage applications by supporting human input devices (HID) such as keyboards, mice, and touchscreens.

Nevion VikinX Sublime

Nevion VikinX Sublime

MultiDyne calls its EOS-4000 an electro-optical matrix routing switcher capable of switching digital signals up to 10Gbps from a system that is fully scalable from 2x2 all the way up to 288x288 matrix sizes. The EOS-4000 is designed to accept up to eight modular port cards with up to 36 small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceiver modules per port card. This routing system supports full matrix, nonblocking switching, and point-to-multipoint or multicast with one wavelength in one direction. The EOS-4000 boasts fully hot-swappable modules including I/O blades, power supplies, network management module, and SFP and XFP transceivers. Optional redundant power supplies are also available. The whole EOS-4000 family of switches is fully scalable, and additional I/O port cards can be added at any time. Since the optics are the pluggable SFP or XFP type, the scalability is on a port-by-port basis.

Nevion, the inventor of the ultracompact, ultralow power routing switcher that changed its name from Network Electronics just before April’s NAB convention, says its VikinX Sublime offers the most extensive range of matrix sizes available (8x8 to 64x64 and 16x2 to 128x2). The VikinX Sublime covers signal formats from analog video/audio to HDTV, with its SMPTE-292 HD products providing support for the 3Gbps dual-link standard. The flexible control options on the VikinX Sublime—such as serial control RS-232, Ethernet, and network control bus—include support for local and remote panels equipped with professional broadcast-quality programmable buttons.

Pesa Cheetah 64 Series

Pesa Cheetah 64 Series

Pesa’s Cheetah 144NE routing system is a high-performance, modular fiber-optic switching system featuring four input and four output slots for pro AV installations that need broadcast-quality HD-SDI and 3G-SDI performance. Each I/O supports up to 36 fiber-optic connections using standard LC-type fiber SFP modules based on 1310nm single-mode lasers. It is expandable in size from 36x36 up to 144x144 in the same 4RU frame, and it is fully compatible with the new QuadBox QFX series of fiber media extenders for dual-link DVI, HD-SDI, and 3G-SDI. The I/O cards in Pesa’s Cheetah 144NE routing system allow easy expansion in groups of 36 inputs and 36 outputs per card, which simplifies future expansion without the need to replace cards or frames. Its frame supports redundant power, and control, and it also provides for a hot-swappable 144x144 crosspoint matrix.

<i>Snell Sirius 800 series</i>

Snell Sirius 800 series

Snell’s new Sirius 800 series SD/HD/3Gbps router is the only matrix switcher to provide 1152x1152 inputs and outputs—and redundancy and multiviewer outputs. This router also uniquely enables input signals to be looped into external video processing devices, such as format converters, before they reach the router’s crosspoint architecture. This means that inputs can be processed as required by inhouse standards without burning a router crosspoint in the process. Sharing the 3Gbps power of its popular Pyxis, Sirius, and Cygnus stable mates, the 800 series router consists of a range of different frames and card configurations all based on a 576x576 matrix common card format, enabling capacity to be swiftly expanded to 1152x1152 even while the system is in use. An easy-to-use graphical touchscreen shows status and diagnostic information for the entire system, which can be accessed remotely with MCM (Multimedia Conference Manager), while simple LED indicators clearly show which crosspoint cards are actively routing signals at all times.

The VX 160 is a 6.25Gbps router from Thinklogical, a subsidiary of Logical Solutions, designed for mission-critical applications with the ability to route and switch up to 160x160 signals. Its 6.25Gbps signal capability supports SD-SDI, HD-SDI, SMPTE digital video formats, as well as optical formats and other high-data-rate signals. The VX 160 is controlled via a dedicated external Linux CPU module with an advanced GUI allowing for control and administration with access provided via a network connection (browser) or a serial port for third-party controller integration such as Crestron, AMX, or home-spun interfaces.

Thinklogical VX 160

Thinklogical VX 160

Utah Scientific has launched a new line of compact routing switchers this year: the Utah-100 family of 8x8 and 16x16 routers in 1RU frame, priced to appeal to system integrators, for signal types ranging all the way from analog to the new 3G HD format. The new Utah-100 series also includes a full-featured sync and test-signal generator with options to suit all professional video applications.

Adding to the company’s successful Utah-400 routing switcher product family, its largest member, the Utah-400/XL, is the first router in the industry to offer a 1056x1056 matrix in a single equipment rack while using industry-standard BNC connectors. Thanks to an innovative matrix architecture, the Utah-400/XL is readily scalable from 288x288 to 1056x1056 and beyond using a single family of matrix building blocks.


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