Research Indicates Finger Better Than Pen Tool for Students Using Interactive Whiteboards

Smart Technologies Inc. announces that a growing body of research validates the benefits of having students use their finger rather than a pen tool to control interactive whiteboards. Several independent research papers point to the specific advantage of using a finger to touch and operate the Smart Board interactive whiteboard.
Author:
Publish date:

Research Indicates Finger Better Than Pen Tool for Students Using Interactive Whiteboards

Mar 25, 2005 6:55 PM

Smart Technologies Inc. announces that a growing body of research validates the benefits of having students use their finger rather than a pen tool to control interactive whiteboards. Several independent research papers point to the specific advantage of using a finger to touch and operate the Smart Board interactive whiteboard. It was found that special pen tools or handheld devices may pose a challenge to some students, whereas the simple touch capability of the Smart Board interactive whiteboard is more engaging, especially for teaching younger students or those with special needs. According to researchers, teaching with the Smart Board interactive whiteboard also accommodates multiple learning styles--visual, auditory and tactile.

“Smart has always focused on developing intuitive classroom solutions,” says Nancy Knowlton, Smart’s president and co-CEO. “This collection of research findings clearly reinforces our thoughtful approach to product design, and proves the suitability and effectiveness of Smart Board interactive whiteboards in the classroom environment.”

“Special schools frequently choose SMART Board interactive whiteboards due to the need to operate it with pure touch rather than via a pen/stylus.” Sean O’Sullivan. September 2004. The Use of Interactive Whiteboards and Touchscreens by Pupils Who Have Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties. Anglia Polytechnic University, UK.

“We have noticed interaction between PMLD [Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties] and SLD [Severe to Moderate Learning Difficulties] youngsters who can now share an activity on the Smart Board [interactive whiteboard]. The SMART Board [interactive whiteboard] can accommodate gross movements which are made in their own time.” Keith Riley-Gledhill, Sir Charles Parsons School, cited in Sean O’Sullivan. September 2004. The Use of Interactive Whiteboards and Touchscreens by Pupils Who Have Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties. Anglia Polytechnic University, UK.

“Those students with strong visual and kinaesthetic learning styles are well catered [to] by a diverse range of Le@rning Federation learning objects especially if they are used in the context of a SMART Board [interactive whiteboard] – the electronic whiteboard that allows more whole body engagement with a learning object.” Lea Chapuis. June 2004. Learning Objects. Australian Capital Territory Education and Training, Australia.

“In the Bridge School, a student, who has profound and multiple learning difficulties, can touch the [Smart Board interactive] whiteboard to activate her favourite music.… This has encouraged her to reach out beyond her normal range of movement and she enjoys the freedom of being able to walk around.… The [Smart Board interactive] whiteboard provides an excellent focal point for pupils who find it difficult to work collaboratively. They are encouraged to interact with each other as well as the [interactive whiteboard].” Andrew Beswetherick. December 2003. Information and Communications Technology and Its Impact on Learning. Best Practice Research Scholarships, UK.

Featured

Related