Doppler Labs wants to change how you listen to concerts

By John Lagomarsino, The Verge
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
By John Lagomarsino, The Verge
here active listening_white buds-and-phone (1).jpg

Here Active Listening System

Ask co-founder Noah Kraft what the goal of Doppler is, and he says, "we want to put a computer, speaker, and mic in everyone's ear." That's precisely the idea behind Doppler's Here Active Listening System. Here is a pair of small battery-powered buds with a microphone, a speaker, and a near-zero-latency digital sound processor (DSP) designed to alter, in real time, the way we hear the world.The primary goal of the system is to enhance the sound of live performances, custom tailored to the listener's own preferences and perspective. It's a niche product aimed at audiophiles who really care about the way things sound. Here aims to enhance live audio in three ways. First, there's a simple volume control. The microphones take input from the world, and Here either attenuates or amplifies the overall volume. Second, Here can apply a suite of equalizer effects to emphasize or suppress certain frequencies in the sound spectrum. The system will also target specific frequencies with anti-noise to further suppress, say, the frequencies of a baby crying, or an overactive hi-hat cymbal in a live mix. Lastly, Here also comes with a set of effects like flange, reverb, delay, fuzz, and bitcrusher to further mess with the world around you.You control all of this through a smartphone app, which sends your settings to the buds via Bluetooth. However, all the processing occurs in the buds themselves; the app is simply a remote control for Here. MORE@TheVerge

Featured

Related

download (2).jpeg

In depth: Windows 10 review

Looking back at Windows 8, it’s easy to see where Microsoft went wrong. It was a giant bet on touch-based computing, but it made using a PC with a keyboard and mouse awkward, frustrating, and outright confusing. In our original review, I wrote that there was a “risk of alienating ...read more

mp.jpeg

Apple admits the Mac Pro was a mess

Apple admitted that its flashy 2013 Mac Pro redesign was a mistake, and executives indicated that Apple intends to better support its professional users in the future. “I think we designed ourselves into a bit of a thermal corner, if you will,” one of Apple’s top executives ...read more

Image placeholder title

How Do You SPL Relief?

How Do You SPL Relief? Apr 12, 2010 12:00 PM, By George Petersen Figure 1. OSHA-defined permissible noise exposure standards in the workplace.Anyone who works with sound-reinforcement systems spends a lot of time dealing with a lot of unsolved mysteries. The most common of ...read more